SUPERIOR, Mont. -

Boeing says it has experts from its company and Spirit Aerosystems assessing the damage to six 737 fuselages that slid into the Clark Fork River in Montana after a train derailment last week.

The company says train cars carrying assemblies for the 777 and 747 have been inspected and their content appears undamaged.

The assemblies will be shipped to the Boeing plant in Everett, Washington for plant for final assembly.

The train was en route from Spirit Aerosystems in Wichita to the Boeing final assembly plant in Renton, Washington.
 
The cause of the derailment is still under investigation.

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Crews have removed all three commercial airplane fuselages from a river embankment in western Montana after they tumbled off a train in a derailment.

Montana Rail Link spokeswoman Lynda Frost tells the Missoulian that the last of the newly manufactured Boeing 737 fuselages was hoisted up Tuesday. A fuselage is the main body of an aircraft.

Nineteen train cars derailed Thursday, spilling three fuselages into the Clark Fork River near Alberton and three more near the tracks. Frost says the fuselages and their flatbed cars weigh a combined 70 tons each.

The fuselages and other airplane parts were being transported from a manufacturing plant in Wichita, Kansas, to Boeing facilities in Washington state.

Railway officials are investigating the cause of the derailment.

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Crews have removed the second of three commercial airplane bodies from a river embankment in western Montana following a train derailment.

Montana Rail Link spokeswoman Lynda Frost says the second newly manufactured Boeing 737 fuselage was winched up Monday without any problems.

She says the third is expected to be removed from the Clark Fork River embankment near Alberton by the end of Tuesday.

Nineteen train cars derailed on Thursday, spilling three fuselages into the river and three more near the tracks. Frost says the fuselages and their flatbed cars weigh a combined 70 tons each.

The fuselages and other airplane parts were being transported from a manufacturing plant in Wichita, Kansas, to Boeing facilities in Washington state.

Railway officials are investigating the cause of the derailment.

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Boeing is deciding what to do with six newly manufactured commercial airplane bodies that fell off a train in a derailment in western Montana, including three that slid down a steep riverbank.

The fuselages were built by Spirit Aerosystems in Wichita, Kansas. Boeing spokeswoman Dina Weiss said Monday experts from Boeing and Spirit are at the site.

She said in a statement some Boeing 777 and 747 airplane parts appear undamaged after Thursday's derailment and will be shipped to the company's Everett, Washington, assembly plant.

The derailment sent three 737 fuselages down an embankment of the Clark Fork River and knocked three others from the train.

Crews are working to hoist the fuselages from the river about 50 miles west of Missoula.

Lynda Frost, Montana Rail Link spokeswoman, said it took about 12 hours to remove the first of three commercial airplane bodies that fell into the river. Specialized machines are pulling the 20-ton fuselages attached to 50-ton flatbed cars from the embankment one at a time at a rate of 20 feet per hour. The second fuselage is expected to be removed Tuesday.

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Removing three Boeing 737 fuselages from the Clark Fork River in western Montana following a train derailment could take until Tuesday.

Lynda Frost, Montana Rail Link spokeswoman, says progress at the site on Sunday is slow as a crew of 50 with eight heavy equipment machines worked in conjunction on the steep bank.

"The progress is going extremely slow," Frost told the Associated Press. "If we get one up today, it would appear it will take one day each to get them out."

A train carrying parts manufactured by Wichita's Spirt Aerosystems en route to Boeing's final assembly plant in Washington derailed about 18 miles east of Superior Thursday.

No one was injured when 19 cars from the westbound train derailed. The train carried six fuselages. Three others also fell off, but stayed on the land.

Kenneth Evans, Sprit spokesman, confirms the train was carrying fuselages and other parts manufactured in Wichita. The cars were heading to Boeing's final assembly plant in Renton, Wash.

In a statement, Boeing said, "We have been informed that a BNSF train carrying six 737 fuselages and assemblies for the 777 and 747 derailed near Rivulet, Montana. We have deployed experts to the scene to begin a thorough assessment of the situation."

Spirit AeroSystems says it has been working closely with its customer since the incident and are confident the challenges it presents can be overcome.

"The Spirit team's resolve was tested with an even greater challenge as recently as the 2012 Wichita tornado," the company said in a statement. "We are confident that, working together, we will overcome whatever challenges may be presented."

The cause remains under investigation.