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Kansas lawmakers reject requiring in-person classes March 26

Kansas state Reps. Kyle Hoffman, left, R-Coldwater, and Ken Rahjes, R-Agra, confer during a...
Kansas state Reps. Kyle Hoffman, left, R-Coldwater, and Ken Rahjes, R-Agra, confer during a House debate on a bill dealing with public schools and COVID-19, Monday, March 15, 2021, at the Statehouse in Topeka. The House has given first-round approval to the measure, which requires all school districts to offer all in-person classes to all students by March 26, 2021. (AP Photo/John Hanna)(AP Photo/John Hanna)
Published: Mar. 16, 2021 at 4:12 PM CDT
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TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) - A Republican proposal to require all Kansas public schools to offer every student full in-person classes by March 26 has failed in the state House.

Some lawmakers had complained that it would take too much power away from local school boards.

The GOP-controlled House’s 69-55 vote against the measure Tuesday showed that some Republicans had misgivings. The bill would have overridden a few local school districts’ decisions to wait longer because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Senate President Ty Masterson, an Andover Republican, pushed for the mandate, and his GOP-controlled chamber approved it earlier this month with no Democratic support. Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly was skeptical of it.

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