Advertisement

Sports betting bill lives on at Kansas Statehouse

After the bill to legalize sports betting in Kansas was thought to be dead for the session after failing to pass out of committee, it passed the full House.
Published: Mar. 30, 2022 at 4:20 PM CDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

TOPEKA, Kan. (KWCH) - A day after the bill to legalize sports betting in Kansas was thought to be dead for the session after failing to pass out of committee, it passed the full House Wednesday with broad, bipartisan support.

A late-in-the-legislative-session play keeps sports betting alive, at least for now. Last year, the Senate passed out a different version of a bill allowing sports betting in Kansas. It’s legal in about 30 other states and Missouri is also moving closer to making it law.

Specifically, the bill that passed out of the House Wednesday would allow for sports gambling through casino managers contracted by the Kansas Lottery. It would allow for bets to be placed in-person or on approved online platforms.

To legally make a bet, you’d need to be at least 21 and have sufficient funds to place the bets. The state would receive 14 percent from wagers placed in casinos and 20 percent for online bets.

Casinos could also reach agreements with professional sports teams and offer betting at their stadiums.

“The rest of the country is moving this direction. It doesn’t really do us really any good to stand still other than it lets money leak out of the state and others around the country make the money,” Rep. Vic Miller, D-Topeka, said.

Lawmakers made several changes to the bill as it was written to allow for more resources and help people with gambling addictions. Concern about addiction is why some lawmakers voted against the bill.

“Just like we did with the casinos, we will talk about having a gambling fund to help (address) the addiction,” Rep. Brenda Landwehr, R-Wichita, said.

The bill next heads to conference committee where senators and representatives need to work out differences between two versions. One of the biggest differences is what the state would collect in taxes. Lawmakers adjourn the regular legislative session Friday in Topeka.

Copyright 2022 KWCH. All rights reserved.