Couple behind bill allowing CBD oil with THC attends hearing in Topeka

TOPEKA, Kan. Lawmakers in Topeka Tuesday held a hearing on a bill that would allow people with life-threatening medical conditions to get treatment with CBD oil with a small amount of THC.

CBD is a non-psychoactive compound found in hemp that many see as a way to better health.

Gwen and Scott Hartley are behind House Bill 2244, or, "Claire and Lola's Law," named for their daughters, born five years apart with Microcephaly. With the birth defect, a child is born with a head that is much smaller compared with babies of the same age and sex.

Seventeen-year-old Claire Hartley died in December. Gwen and Scott Hartley say they're now focused on doing what they can to save 12-year-old Lola's life. The girl's dwarfism and seizures put her at a higher risk for sudden death and the family believes treatment with CBD oil could greatly improve her quality of life and even extend her life.

The Hartleys pushed for a hearing on Claire and Lola's Law, an affirmative-defense law. During Tuesday's House Committee hearing, lawmakers spoke in support and opposition to the proposed legislation.

"What I’m really hoping is that everybody has compassion. I mean, that’s all we’re really looking for is compassion, understanding what we’re going through as parents and try to optimize Lola’s life," Scott Hartley said. "And this law could be so beneficial to not only Lola but so many other kids in the state."

Opponents of the bill worried it amounts to "backdoor legislation" and are concerned with the proposed state law breaking federal law. With the federal-law concern, opponents who spoke said they wanted the CBD with THC to go through the FDA process.

Proponents say children are suffering and parents are not going to give their children something dangerous.

"I’d like to think that people are going to be receptive to this and they’re going to be open to the possibility of getting this started for Kansas," Gwen Hartley said.