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House bill supports doing away with 'falling back' and 'springing forward'

In this Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016 photo, a worker pulls the minute hand on a Grayson Virginia...
In this Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016 photo, a worker pulls the minute hand on a Grayson Virginia clock dial at Electric Time Co., in Medfield, Mass. Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. local time Sunday, when clocks are set back one hour. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)(KWCH)
Published: Jan. 2, 2020 at 9:25 AM CST
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It's a hot topic that comes up twice per year: Daylight Saving Time. Ahead of the 2020 Kansas legislative session, at least one state lawmaker wants to talk about doing away with "falling back" and "springing forward."

Those common terms ("fall back" and "spring forward") could be forgotten if the federal government were to pass a law saying Daylight Saving Time (from March to November) is the standard for the U.S. The bill that Rep. Kristey Williams (R-Augusta) is trying to pass, states that Kansas will be prepared for a possible change popular opinion suggests many want.

Williams tried passing a bill last year exempting Kansas from Daylight Saving Time. She says the current bill, House Bill No. 2422 is different, expressing support for Kansans wanting more daylight while they're awake.

"In Kansas, most citizens don't want to stay on standard time all the time, and the reason is simple. We want more daylight hours, hours when we are awake and less when we're sleeping," Williams says.